Barrel Cactus Provide Ample Seed for Cooking and Baking

Today’s post is by Jacqueline A. Soule.

Back in November 2014, I introduced you to the pleasures of using barrel cactus fruits (Lovely and Lemony – Barrel Cactus Fruit), and I think it is time to revisit the topic.

Barrel cactus is the generic term for a number of species of large barrel-shaped cacti.  The one with the most edible of fruit is the fish hook or compass barrel (Ferocactus wizlizenii).

Ferocactus wislizeni and zeph JAS 06

This species of barrel cactus is unlike many other species of cacti in that it often blooms two or even three times per year, thus providing you, the harvester, with ample fruits, often several times a year.
Ferocactus wislizeni fruit

You can eat the lemony flavored fruit, but only in moderation.  Fruit is high in oxalic acid, which can be hard on human systems.  But the seeds are just fine to consume in quantity.  They are the size, texture and taste of poppy seeds and can be used anywhere you use poppy seeds.  They can also be cooked in with quinnoa or amaranth, or even eaten alone.

ferocactus fruit 1118

Barrel cactus seed are very simple to harvest in quantity because the seeds are easily removed from the fruit.

Harvest.
The average barrel cactus has 12 to 24 fruits ripe at once (unless the animals have been busy).  24 fruits yield roughly 1/4 cup of seed.

ferocactus fruit 1090
Prepare.  (10 minutes for 24 fruit).

Rinse the fruits.  This does two things.  First, this removes dust and contaminants (bird droppings etc.).  Second, the water softens the former flower petals on the top of the fruit, rendering them  gentler on tender fingers as you process them.

Cut tops off the fruits.  The seed filled chamber is surprisingly far down away from the flower petals.
ferocactus fruit 1099
Cut fruits in half.

ferocactus fruit 1105
Scoop seeds into a terra cotta saucer.  Leave them 24 hours to dry.  This will help dry any bits of flesh clinging to them before you store them.  Alternatively you can put them right onto a baking sheet to toast them if you want to use them toasted.  I also keep a number untoasted and throw them in when I cook quinnoa or amaranth.

ferocactus fruit 1114

Processing tip:

ferocactus fruit 1091

Sometimes you find an empty fruit.  This is why we need our native pollinators!

I like to make an assembly line and cut all tops off first, then cut all fruits open, then scoop all the seed. Why?  because the seeds inside the fruit may be gummed together and you want to leave the seed scooping to last, else you get sticky seeds everywhere and lose a portion of your crop all over everything.

ferocactus fruit 1095

JAS avatar

If you live in Southeastern Arizona, please come to one of my many free lectures.  Look for me at many branches of the Pima County Library, or possibly Steam Pump Ranch, Tubac Presidio, and more.  After each event I will be signing copies of my books, including the latest, (due out in September 2016) “Month-by-Month Guide to Gardening in Arizona,  Nevada and New Mexico (Cool Springs Press).

Advertisements
Categories: Cooking, Edible Landscape Plant, Sonoran Native, Southwest Food | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: